Talking pet anxiety with U of M

As people begin to head back into the office, dogs and cats that have adjusted to their owners’ presence for the last year will have their own set of adjustments to make. Anxiety at being left home alone can be real for many pets, particularly dogs. Kristi Flynn, DVM, an assistant professor at the Department…

Talking tick season with U of M

Along with summer comes the tick season in Minnesota. Many ticks can carry bacteria, viruses, and parasites that can harm humans, including Lyme disease and anaplasmosis. According to the Minnesota Department of Health, in 2018, there were 950 confirmed Lyme disease cases and 496 confirmed or probable cases of anaplasmosis in Minnesota. Jon Oliver with…

Protect yourself and your pets from harmful algae blooms this summer

With the intense heat of the past few days, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) is asking people to be on the lookout for harmful algae blooms on lakes and rivers around the state. Be alert to the possible presence of toxic algae, which can be harmful to both people and animals. Blooms typically begin…

End of life for pets

Two weeks ago, Jean described her family’s experience with the most heart-wrenching aspect of pet ownership: the day we are forced to helplessly face the inevitability of outliving our pets. Some refer to parenting as the “Great Equalizer,” meaning no matter who you are, man or woman, rich or poor, stoic or emotional, raising kids…

Dog breath

Ever wonder why our poor dogs are what we use to compare someone’s foul-smelling breath? Pretty much everyone agrees that puppy breath is pleasant, then at some undefined point, things go awry and having our dogs breathe in our faces is no longer welcome. The reason for this is the most common disease we see in our pets next to obesity, which is periodontal disease.

Your dog eats its own what?

Speaking of things your pet shouldn’t be eating, why wouldn’t its own poo top the list?

With the type of prescription drug commercials we have to sit through on TV now (you know the ones I mean), I figure if they’re going to broadcast awkward and uncomfortable human topics into our living rooms every day, why not address an embarrassing-to-discuss topic about our pets?